To which international anti-corruption conventions is your country party?

Bribery & Corruption

Australia Small Flag Australia

Australia is a party to:

  • the OECD Convention;
  • the United Nations Convention against Corruption; and
  • the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organised Crime.

Poland Small Flag Poland

  • The United Nations Convention against Corruption, adopted by General Assembly Resolution 58/4 of 31 October 2003, signed by Poland on 10 December 2003;
  • The OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions, which entered into force on 7 November 2000;
  • The Council of Europe Civil Law Convention on corruption adopted on 4 November 1999, which entered into force on 1 November 2003;
  • The Council of Europe Criminal Law Convention on corruption adopted on 27 January 1999, which entered into force on 1 April 2003.

Ireland Small Flag Ireland

Ireland has signed and ratified the following international anti-corruption conventions:

  • the EU Convention on the Protection of the European Communities Financial Interests (and Protocols) – entered into force on 17 October 2002;
  • the OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Officials in International Business Transactions – entered into force on 21 November 2003;
  • the Council of Europe Criminal Law Convention on Corruption – entered into force on 1 February 2004;
  • the Convention of the Fight against Corruption involving Officials of the European Communities or Officials of Member States of the European Union – entered into force on 28 September 2005;
  • Additional Protocol to the Council of Europe Criminal Law Convention on Corruption – entered into force on 1 November 2005;
  • the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime – entered into force on 17 July 2010; and
  • the UN Convention against Corruption – entered into force on 9 December 2011.

Ireland signed the Council of Europe Civil Law Convention on Corruption on 4 November 1999 but has not yet ratified it.

Brazil Small Flag Brazil

  • OAS Inter-American Convention Against Corruption, of 1996, internalized in Brazil by Federal Decree No. 4.410/2002;
  • OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials, of 1997, Internalized in Brazil by Federal Decree No. 3.678/2000; and
  • UN Convention Against Corruption, of 2003, Internalized in Brazil by Federal Decree No. 5.678/2006.

United Kingdom Small Flag United Kingdom

  • The United Nations Convention Against Corruption
  • The United Nations Convention Against Transnational Organised Crime
  • The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions
  • The Council of Europe Criminal Law Convention on Corruption (with Additional Protocol)
  • The Council of Europe Civil Law Convention on Corruption
  • The Convention on the Fight Against Corruption Involving Officials of the European Communities or Officials of Member States of the European Union
  • The Convention on the Protection of the European Communities Financial Interests and Protocols
  • The Agreement for the Establishment of the International Anti-Corruption Academy (yet to be ratified)

UAE Small Flag UAE

As discussed in question one, the UAE has ratified the UNCAC treaty and is a member of the Arab Council. Both UNCAC and the Arab Council were created specially to combat corruption on a global and territorial scale respectively. Ratifying of the UNCAC means that along with all 178 countries, as of October 2017, the UAE can combat corruption on a global scale. With so many countries ratifying the agreement, there is a unified front against corruption and everyone will be tackling it in the same or similar ways. Being a member of the Arab Council is also important as there are unique problems regarding corruption facing the Arab states that may not be applicable in the rest of the world, so it is vital that the Arab states join forces in combatting corruption on a smaller scale than UNCAC allows.

Singapore Small Flag Singapore

Singapore is a signatory to the United Nations Convention against Corruption – having acceded on 11 November 2005 and ratified on 6 November 2009. It is also a member of the ABD/OECD Anti-Corruption Initiative for Asia and Pacific and the APEC Anti-Corruption and Transparency Experts' Working Group (ACTWG).

CPIB attends annual Economic Crime Agency Network (ECAN) meetings and thrice-yearly G20 Anti-Corruption Working Group sessions (ACWG), is an Executive Committee member of the International Association of Anti-Corruption Authorities (IAACA), and is a founding member of South-East Asia - Parties against Corruption (SEA-PAC).

Since 1992, Singapore has also been a member of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), and since 1997 part of the FATF-regional body: Asia/Pacific Group on Money-Laundering (APGML).

China Small Flag China

The Chinese government signed the United Nations Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime (the “Convention”) in December 2000, which came into force in China on October 13, 2003. Although this Convention is a generally applicable to all transnational organization crimes, corruption is one of its the primary focuses, which requires the contracting states to take measures through legislation and law enforcement to promote anti-corruption.

Later, China was actively involved in the formation stage of the United Nations Convention against Corruption (“Anti-Corruption Convention”), and was among the first countries to ratify it, with one reservation on the paragraph 2 of Article 66 regarding dispute settlement channel, and it officially took effect in China on February 12, 2006. The Anti-Corruption Convention is the only legally binding universal anti-corruption instrument with the framework established on 5 pillars which are Preventive Measures, Criminalization and Law Enforcement, International Cooperation, Asset Recovery, and Technical Assistance & Information Exchange. At the end of 2016, 10 years after China’s ratification of the Anti-Corruption Convention, a status review report on China’s implementation of the Anti-Corruption Convention was published by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, in which China’s efforts and dedication in anti-corruption through active law enforcement, successive international cooperation and sustainable good practices have been well recognized.

Mexico Small Flag Mexico

Mexico is a party to the following international anti-corruption conventions:

(i) the OAS Inter-American Convention Against Corruption;

(ii) the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention, officially the Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions; and

(iii) the United Nations Convention against Corruption.

Greece Small Flag Greece

Greece has ratified all major international anti-corruption conventions and has passed legal provisions to conform with them:

The UN Convention Against Corruption (Law 3666/2008); the Council of Europe Criminal Law Convention on Corruption and Additional Protocol (Law 3560/2007); the Council of Europe Civil Law Convention on Corruption (Law 2957/2001); the EU Convention on the Protection of the European Communities’ Financial Interests (Law 2803/2000); the EU Convention Against Corruption Involving Officials of the European Communities or Officials of Member States of the European Union (Official Journal C195 of June 25 1997) (Law 2802/2000); and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions (Law 2656/1998).

In addition to the above, Greece complies with the EU policies against corruption in specific industries (e.g. public works) stipulated by EU Regulations or EU Directives.

India Small Flag India

A few international anti-corruption conventions to which India is a signatory / member are as follows:

  • United Nations Convention against Corruption 2003 (UNCAC)

    UNCAC facilitates international co-operation and mutual legal assistance in investigating cases of corruption and recovery of assets. UNCAC requires state parties to the treaty to implement several anti-corruption measures that focus on five main areas: prevention, law enforcement, international cooperation, asset recovery, and technical assistance and information exchange.

  • United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime

    This Convention is an international instrument to fight organized crime and to adopt crime control measures such as money laundering, corruption, extradition laws etc.

  • India-Brazil-South Africa Cooperation Agreement

    This agreement is an international tripartite group agreement to promote international cooperation between the countries and combat various issues such as social responsibility, ethic, corruption etc.

Angola Small Flag Angola

Angola is a party to the Protocol against Corruption of the Community for Development of Southern Africa, of 2001; and to the United Nations Convention against Corruption, of 2003. Through Resolution no. 38/10, 17 December 2010, Angola adhered to the International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism.

Portugal Small Flag Portugal

Portugal is party to the following conventions:

  • OECD Convention on combatting bribery of foreign public officials in international business transactions;
  • European Union Convention on the fight against corruption involving officials of the European Communities or officials of Member States of the European Union;
  • Council of Europe Criminal Convention on Corruption;
  • United Nations Convention against Corruption.

Denmark Small Flag Denmark

Denmark has ratified several anti-corruption conventions, notably the OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions, the Council of Europe’s Criminal Law Convention on Corruption, and the United Nations Convention against Corruption. Denmark is also a member of the Group of States against Corruption (GRECO), which monitors the members’ compliance with the organisation’s anti-corruption standards.

Additionally, Denmark is a EU Member State and has implemented relevant EU legislation on corruption, such as the Directive on Procurement implementing restrictions on participation in public procurement tenders and the Convention on the Protection of the European Communities’ Financial Interests with later protocols.

It is worthy of mention that Denmark has not yet ratified the Council of Europe’s Civil Law Convention on Corruption.

Germany Small Flag Germany

Various anti-corruption conventions apply in Germany, such as:

  • UN Convention against Corruption;
  • UN Convention against Transnational Organised Crime;
  • EU Convention on the Fight against Corruption involving Officials of the European Communities/Member States of the EU;
  • EU Council Framework decision 2003/568/JHA;
  • Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Convention on the Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions; and
  • Resolution (99) 5 of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe and the Council of Europe Resolution (97) 24.

Italy Small Flag Italy

Italy is party to the following anti-corruption conventions:

  • the Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development 1997;
  • the Criminal Law Convention on Corruption (Treaty 173 of the Council of Europe) 1999; and
  • the UN Convention Against Corruption 2003.

Macau Small Flag Macau

  • United Nations’ Convention against Corruption, adopted in New York on October 31st 2003;
  • Agreement for the Constitution of the International Academy against Corruption as an International Organisation, concluded in Vienna on September 2nd 2010.

Mozambique Small Flag Mozambique

HRA: Mozambique is party to the following conventions:

  • Protocol against Corruption of the Southern African Development Community, of 2001;
  • United Nations Convention against Corruption, of 2003; and
  • African Union Convention on Prevention and Control of Corruption, of 2003.

Japan Small Flag Japan

Japan is a party for the following international legal frameworks:

  • Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions;
  • The United Nations Convention against Transnational Organised Crime and the United Nations Convention against Corruption.

France Small Flag France

The French legal arsenal is part of a global fight against corruption which complies notably with the following texts:

  • The OECD Convention of 21 November 1997 on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials ;
  • The Criminal Convention on Corruption issued in Strasburg on 27 January 1999 and signed by France on 9 September 1999 ( and its Additional Protocol of 15 May 2003) ;
  • The Civil Law Convention on Corruption done at Strasburg on 4 November 1999.

France is party to both the OECD convention as well as the UNCAC. Furthermore, numerous French companies have fallen under the extra-territoriality of the UK Bribery Act as well as the FCPA. It should be noted, however, that French Codes serve as sources of law for corruption and bribery. More specifically, with regard to international corruption, Articles 435-1 (and seq) of the French Criminal Code applies.

Switzerland Small Flag Switzerland

Switzerland is a signatory to the OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions (1997), which it had co-developed and fully implemented since it came into force.

Switzerland has also ratified the UN Convention against Corruption (2003) and the Council of Europe’s Criminal Law Convention on Corruption (1999), but not its Civil Law Convention on Corruption (1999). Further, Switzerland has further ratified the UN Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime (2000) that also contains undertakings to prohibit and sanction corruption of public officials.

United States Small Flag United States

The United States is a party to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Anti-Bribery Convention, the United Nations Convention Against Corruption, the Inter-American Convention Against Corruption. The United States is also a member of the OECD Working Group on Bribery and Anti-Bribery Convention.

Updated: June 11, 2018