Employment law in Scotland: a different path? | Brodies

Legal Briefing

The Scottish independence referendum and the general election campaign have both thrown a spotlight on employment law, with change looking inevitable. Following the Smith Commission which published its report in November 2014 there is a real possibility that the administration of the Employment Tribunal system will be different in England and Scotland. A new government …

The Court of Appeal lifts stay on liquidators’ claim to recover shares in Saad Group insolvency | Druces LLP

Legal Briefing

A recent Court of Appeal decision has examined the complex issues relating to the law applicable to the cross-border trusts in the context of the winding up of a substantial Middle Eastern investment vehicle. The case is of general application to cross-border trusts but is of particular interest in the context of insolvency where the …

Fair Consideration Framework: 
one year on | Magrath Sheldrick LLP

Legal Briefing

In late 2013, the Singapore Government announced that the introduction of the 
Fair Consideration Framework (FCF) would 
be made mandatory on all employers of foreign nationals in Singapore with effect from 1 August 2014. Since this date, all employers doing business in Singapore have been expected to consider Singaporeans fairly for job vacancies and to …

Developments in waste crime enforcement: what next for offenders, waste operators and landlords?
 | Burges Salmon

Legal Briefing

The consequences of small and 
large-scale waste crime reach far beyond the unpopular effects on local amenity. Indeed, rogue operators undercut legitimate waste businesses and expose landlords of industrial or commercial premises to regulatory action and financial risk. The environmental, commercial and financial threats posed by waste crime have been recognised by Defra. On 26 …

Mitigation: cynical defendants beware | Cooley

Legal Briefing

An innocent party seeking to claim damages for breach of contract must take reasonable steps to mitigate its losses. This is a well-established principle of English law that has proved many a defendant’s ally.