Firm Focus: AdamsonJones | AdamsonJones

Legal Briefing

AdamsonJones provides intellectual property (IP) services encompassing patent, design and trade mark protection and advice in the UK, Europe and throughout the world. The firm works with an expanding list of sophisticated and demanding clients, ranging from innovative start-ups and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to multinational corporations and internationally renowned universities. AdamsonJones also represents …

Word on the street: advertising, street art and intellectual property | Boodle Hatfield

Legal Briefing

Recently, McDonald’s and other brands have been accused of cultural appropriation, using without permission the work of street artists in advertising campaigns in Europe. These companies will spend many millions on protecting their own brands and for McDonald’s, with a strong tradition in supporting the arts, it should have known better.

Mark Cooper, Cadent Gas

Feature

Within a month of Mark Cooper joining National Grid (NG)’s in-house team in 2015, things became very busy very quickly. UK general counsel Rachael Davidson told him that one of the businesses he was looking after – NG’s gas distribution network – was going to be sold off.

GC 2.0

Do you know your cash-burn phase from your TLDNR? Welcome to the buccaneering, hierarchy-lite world of the fast-growth, tech-driven ‘disruptors’, the kind of business that a growing number of lawyers aspire to work in or advise.

Edging closer to a UK draft Data Protection bill for GDPR implementation | Eversheds Sutherland

Legal Briefing

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has just published a ‘Statement of Intent’ on the Data Protection Bill. For those hoping to see the draft bill itself, sadly we will have to wait. It is not the draft bill, but simply a statement of what it plans to do to keep in line …

Education, education, education

Speaking at the Westminster Legal Policy Forum recently, renowned industry futurologist Richard Susskind accused the UK’s law schools of being stuck in the 1970s, preparing graduates to undertake work that will become increasingly uncommon while failing to train aspiring solicitors in the new technologies that will replace much of the work lawyers now do.